Single Lung Breathing

Foundations: Breathing in Pilates – One Lung Breathing

Foundations: Breathing

Quick Intro: Breathing in Pilates

I suggest mastering and being comfortable with being able to differentiate between diaphragm (here) and lateral breathing (here) before tackling this – otherwise you’ll likely get frustrated.

 

What’s it good for?

🌟  Increases the expansion of your ribcage that will help you to develop lung capacity – just like lateral breathing.

🌟 It teaches us control and precision of movement – a Principle of Pilates.

🌟 If you suffer from scoliosis of the upper spine, one lung breathing can help.  Try practising breathing into your concave side to increase he mobility of this side as well as controlling the movement of the convex side.

🌟 It can have beneficial results for people who suffer from breathing and lung problems such as asthma or if you are recovering from pneumonia.

Hints and Tips: One Lung Breathing

🌟 To begin with, try pulling in both sides of your ribcage and just relax the side that you want to breathe into…

🌟 Sit quietly and notice how the air flows through your nose, cooling it slightly, and into the expanding lung.

🌟 Lie on your side (see the video below) with a pillow or small cushion under your ribcage and breathe into the topside.  The cushion will increase the sensation of expansion, allowing you to more easily control it.

🌟 If you have scoliosis, try putting the support under the convex side and breath into the upper concave side.

Hints and Tips: One Lung Breathing

🌟 To begin with, try pulling in both sides of your ribcage and just relax the side that you want to breathe into…

🌟 Sit quietly and notice how the air flows through your nose, cooling it slightly, and into the expanding lung.

🌟 Lie on your side (as in the video above) with a pillow or small cushion under your ribcage and breathe into the topside.  The cushion will increase the sensation of expansion, allowing you to more easily control it.

🌟 If you have scoliosis, try putting the support under the convex side and breath into the upper concave side.

 

Any Questions?

Ask away – I love to help!  Click here for the Contact Page 🙂 – or leave a comment at the bottom of the post – see you there…

Miguel 🙂

No Comments

Post A Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.